Seeing

One of my very favourite arrivals on Sunday morning is the latest version of Brainpickings,org – Maria is an amazing curator of interesting sources of reflections on life.  And today’s talk is about busyness.

It’s interesting to read how concerned that Kierkegaard was in 1843 – complaining about people being “brisk about their food and their work”.  So it got me off the hook to spend more than three hours over a relaxing lunch saying good bye to friends who were moving soon – I wish I could say the same about the briskness of daily tasks.

Hesse is also quoted extensively today on other ways to avoid busyness – but there is one way that moving into new quarters has worked for me,  He says:

Just try it once — a tree, or at least a considerable section of sky, is to be seen anywhere. It does not even have to be blue sky; in some way or another the light of the sun always makes itself felt. Accustom yourself every morning to look for a moment at the sky and suddenly you will be aware of the air around you, the scent of morning freshness that is bestowed on you between sleep and labor. You will find every day that the gable of every house has its own particular look, its own special lighting. Pay it some heed if you will have for the rest of the day a remnant of satisfaction and a touch of coexistence with nature. Gradually and without effort the eye trains itself to transmit many small delights, to contemplate nature and the city streets, to appreciate the inexhaustible fun of daily life. From there on to the fully trained artistic eye is the smaller half of the journey; the principal thing is the beginning, the opening of the eyes.

On the first evening of daylight saving time even that sky helps take us away from our petty distractions with a moment of awe.

 

An intimate look at design

The designer of the Olympic Cauldron talks about other designs of Heatherwick Studios and how he creates them.

The Garden of Ideas

Here’s a diversion that is more than worthwhile:

Where arts and technology meet

This inspiring story shows how using what we have – or don’t have! – can lead us in positive new directions. It’s all about convergence of different kinds of capability coming together to produce a beautiful thing.

Seasonal Greetings

A quiet moment for the holiday recorded by some friends and fellow choristers with best wishes for a restful and peaceful holiday

Gratitude

Thanks once again to Robert Genn – here is something worth watching. You need 10 minutes.

Greetings of the Season

This performance owes much to the creativity of my good friend Robert Cooper, for many years producer of the Canadian Broadcasting Company’s programme, Choral Concert as well as a conductor of choirs, operas, and festivals throughout Canada and beyond. It’s exactly the kind of thing that he would do to take the music that he loves to new audiences -I’m proud to include Chorus Niagara among my clients.

Whatever your faith tradition or lack of one, I hope that you will join them in singing Handel’s famous classic – and send best wishes for the holiday season.